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BIENNIAL REPORT 



3? 



OF THE 



INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY 

fOR WOMEN 



KINSTON, N. C. 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1932 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY 
FOR WOMEN 



KINSTON, N. C. 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1932 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

R. F. Beasley Monroe 

W. N. Holt Smithfield 

J. L. Becton Wilmington 

Mrs. Mary Bennett Little Wadesboro 

Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor 

OFFICERS 

R. F. Beasley . Chairman 

W. N. Holt Secretary and Treasurer 

VISITING STAFF 

W. N. Holt Board Consultant 

A. M. McCuistan Physician 

Elsa Ernst Psychologist 

J. Garves Poole Dentist 

SUPERINTENDENT 

Miss Altona F. Gales July 1, 1930, to December 31, 1930 

Mrs. Marion F. Gallup From March 1, 1931 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

To His Excellency, Hon. 0. Max Gardner, 
Governor of North Carolina. 

Dear Sir: 

We have the honor of transmitting to your Excellency the 
Biennial Report of the Board of Directors and the Superin- 
tendent of The State Industrial Farm Colony for Women for 
the two years ended, June 30, 1932. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. F. Beasley, 

Chairman. 



4 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



Mr. Roland F. Beasley, 
Chairman Board of Directors. 

The Colony is located seven miles northwest of Kinston, and 
is a farm of 488 acres, mostly in wood land. 

This institution was opened April 3, 1929. It had no printed 
report covering the time from then until June 30, 1930, when 
the biennial period closed. 

Forty-two cases are recorded as admitted and twelve pa- 
roled during that time. Thus, at the beginning of this bien- 
nial period we find on the roll, thirty inmates. In 1930-31 
thirty-four were admitted and on March 1, 1931, there were 
thirty-six inmates and three staff members housed in the build- 
ing known as "A" Building. 

There are two brick dormitory buildings, a cottage in which 
the farm director lives, a small house originally intended for 
an infirmary, a store house, dairy barn, mule barn and chicken 
houses and other sheds and shelters for stock. The capacity of 
the houses is sixty, without crowding. Eighty could be housed 
without serious crowding. The first building has four single 
rooms and five dormitories for four and five beds; it also has 
the office and small hospital quarters in it. The second build- 
ing has all single rooms for girls. 

For the last four months of 1930-31, a compilation of 
monthly reports from all staff members tell the following: 

The office mail consisted of 438 pieces; all girls' mail cen- 
sored by the office numbered 543 letters and packages. There 
were 94 telephone calls. 

From the Head Matron's report we find that 305 pieces of 
new sewing and 129 pieces of mending were done. There were 
1,462 treatments given for venereal diseases and 262 common 
ills and accidents cared for. The visiting physician, Dr. Mc- 
Cuistan, made 17 calls. An alarming condition of trench mouth 
was found to be existent and Dr. J. Garves Poole was employed 
to come one-half day each week. 

During these four months 9,852 meals were served; 7,184 
pieces of work done in the laundry; 377 quarts of canning was 
done. Outside work done by the girls counted up to 5,213 hours. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 5 

For the last year of the biennial period we present the fol- 
lowing facts and figures: 

Recorded in and out, 782 telephone calls ; nearly 5,000 letters 
and packages. 

Venereal disease treatments numbered 4,980 and common 
ills and accidents 2,400. Dr. McCuistan has called 54 times and 
Dr. Poole 38 times. 

In the sewing department 778 new pieces were made, and 
829 old pieces were mended. 

The laundry has counted 21,568 pieces through their de- 
partment. 

During the year, 47,320 meals have been cooked and served. 
Much of this is tray service to sick or isolated cases. 

We have had seven runaways in the year; six have been 
returned, while one is still at large. In the first runaway three 
girls started out; in twenty-four hours one returned, volun- 
tarily. We identified the men who aided in two escapes and 
prosecuted four and got judgment in the local courts. 

Although these figures seem to loom up as the most vital 
part of the work here, they are not, but it is a very necessary 
part of the routine and most interesting to the public as well 
as to the Departments of State that guide our affairs, both 
financial and spiritual. 

Special case work has been carried through in a small num- 
ber of cases and the need for professional care in behavior prob- 
lems has been demonstrated. Women are not reformed en- 
masse but as individuals; each individual needs to make up her 
mind that she wants to reform and will work with the influ- 
ences that are placed where they can play on her life, daily. 
The women and girls who are sent to the Colony need hospitali- 
zation. Seventy-seven per cent of all cases admitted to date 
have had venereal diseases with one or two types of trouble. 
Other physical ailments found to be existent when the girl is 
admitted are : hookworm, thyroid and mastoid troubles, Vincent 
disease, commonly known as "trench mouth," deficient eyesight 
and hearing, stomach worms, itch, ringworm, etc. 

Many of these are infectious and create serious institutional 
problems. Case histories are lacking in nearly all cases and 
the only foundation upon which we can work is the girl's own 
story, and the examinations we are able to make or have made. 



6 Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 

There is such a close relationship between all behavior and 
the physical condition of the case being studied, that we have 
come to believe that much anti-social conduct may be changed 
under the hospitalization treatment. Of course we find cases 
that try to impose on that phase of our program and are only 
too ready to blame all their troubles to these conditions. 

It is our aim to give to each girl an opportunity to develop 
a standard of morals, a point of view and a goal, by precept and 
example, which will support her when she is again free and on 
her own resources. 

The Kinston Clinic and Memorial General Hospital have 
rendered valuable assistance. Dr. Paul F. Whitaker has made 
seven complete physical examinations and given special treat- 
ment in more than that many cases; Dr. Vance P. Peery has 
made one complete neurological examination and many special 
eye, ear, nose and throat examinations. He has operated two 
tonsil and two double mastoid cases. Dr. Leslie Lee has oper- 
ated three cases and made several examinations; Dr. Floyd 
Wooten has cared for several surgical treatments following 
accidents. 

The hospital keeps us supplied with distilled water and has 
made up special mixtures in their laboratory for us. They also 
examine the milk for our dairy inspection. In fact, we have used 
their personnel and equipment as freely as we would if it were 
our own property and are made to feel that they are glad to 
render the State such service during the present financial strin- 
gency. For the operated cases we have paid regular charity rates 
for hospital expenses, the doctors have donated their services. 

We present here an extract from the report made by Miss 

Elsa Ernst on a small number of cases she examined: 

"The intelligence quotients range from 51 to 107, the mental ages 
range from 8-2 to 17-1; the chronological ages show girls from the ages 
of 16 to 49. This wide range however, is, I think, typical of most insti- 
tutions of your sort, and necessitates a highly specialized and individualized 
program, such as you are endeavoring at the present time, to establish." 

An interesting table is presented below. I gave Miss Ernst 

a list of girls that we had every reason to believe, from their 

institutional records, would react as follows : First column, girls 

who would adjust themselves anywhere; second column, girls 

who needed the encouragement of understanding supervision in 

order to adjust themselves to free living; third column, girls 

who would always need supervision. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 7 

Miss Ernst took our lists and made up a chart with the fol- 
lowing comment: 

"In regard to the point we discussed a number of times, that the most 
able of the inmates were not necessarily the most stable nor the most easily 
adjusted, I am sure you will find the accompanying little chart most inter- 
esting. I have placed the three groups as you have given them to me, in 
the order in which they stand on the I. Q. line stretching from 50 to 100. 
It is easily seen from this chart that I. Q. is by no means the whole story, 
nor even the main factor in the story." 



I.Q. 

Scale 


I.Q. 


Case 
No. 


M. A. 


I.Q. 


Case 
No. 


M. A. 


I.Q. 


Case 
No. 


M.A. 


100.. _. 


107 


1 


17-1 



















90 


98 
94 


2 
3 


15-9 
15-0 
















80.... 


82 


4 


13-1 








88 


16 


14-1 






70 


73 


5&6 


11-8 


75 


10 


12-0 


72 


17 


11-6 






60 


69 
63 


7 
23 


11-0 
10-0 


60 


11 


9-7 


64 
63 

57 


18 
19-20 


10-3 
10-1 






50 


59 
54 


8 
24 


9-5 

8-7 


53 
52 
51 


12 

13 

14 & 15 


8-6 
8-4 
8-2 


21-22 


9-2 







Ten months have passed since the above chart was made and 
in the light of actual adjustments made by the girls on parole, 
there must be three changes made. The three borderline cases 
Nos. 5-6-7 must be placed in the second column. They cannot 
face life and hold true to their good resolutions without that 
"understanding supervision" mentioned earlier in this report. 

It is also interesting to note that the three lower I. Q.'s in 
column one have adjusted very satisfactorily. 

Through all this psychological experimentation, Dr. Harry 
W. Crane, Director Division Mental Health and Hygiene, State 
Board Charities and Public Welfare, has given of his time and 
personal attention and has given in his office, many examina- 
tions. If we have taken a case to him, he has immediately made 
us believe that he is truly interested in the girl. He has given 
the final check-up for us in a number of cases. 



8 Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 

Life-long habits cannot be changed overnight. A highly spe- 
cialized professional advisor is absolutely necessary, but just 
as essential as this type of consultant, is the regular staff of 
institution workers of as highly specialized training and experi- 
ence. To the staff now serving at the Colony I wish to be clearly 
understood as crediting them with the satisfactory results ob- 
tained with the girls. 

We want to take this opportunity to express our appreci- 
ation to the Superintendent of Caswell Training School, Dr. 
W. H. Dixon, for his many courtesies including the services of 
Miss Ernst; to the Kinston Clinic and Memorial General Hos- 
pital for their cooperation and valuable services donated to the 
cause of life adjustments through physical adjustments; to the 
club women of the State for their donations of shrubbery and 
trees for the permanent improvement of the campus, and for 
several magazine subscriptions; to the pastors of the Kinston 
churches who have supplied us with church services nearly 
every Sunday afternoon of the year. For their special calls we 
add another word of thanks. Once in a while a case really needs 
the priestly service only obtainable by calling on one of our 
socially-minded pastors. We know we can call upon these men 
for that service. We are indebted to the Unity School of Prac- 
tical Religion of Kansas City, Mo., for literature and friendly 
personal interest in the girls. 

When our girls leave the Colony they pass into the custody 
of the County Welfare Departments of their homes. The length 
of their stay with us is entirely due to their own adjustments 
and their physical conditions. 

The Colony tries to let the girls live a normal, natural life 
under the acceptable standards set by society. The first floor 
of "B" cottage houses honor girls. Since establishing this sys- 
tem, no girl has had to be moved for breaking the trust placed 
in her. 

The past year on the farm was very satisfactory. A perma- 
nent pasture has been fenced and planted; two new chicken 
houses have been built, using home-made furnaces for heating; 
wood has been furnished for the majority of the fuel used; 
some swamp has been cleared; the ditch banks have been kept 
clean; in fact, the farm begins to take on the appearance of a 
well-kept truck farm. Pigs and chickens seem to thrive here 
and a development in both of these lines has been started. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 9 

A forest fire threatened all the farm buildings and it re- 
quired outside help to stop it. The fire department and the 
police department of Kinston responded with cars and men and 
in less than three hours the fire was out. We have found both 
city and county officials at Kinston always ready to lend a hand 
and we appreciate their friendly spirit of cooperation. 

A financial statement is included in the exhibits. We have 
done some things we thought impossible. We used 67% of the 
total appropriation. There is just so much money available, we 
will take our share and try to make a creditable accounting. 
We increased the population 50% this year. 

Marian F. Gallup, 

Superintendent. 



10 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



TABLE NO. 1 
GENERAL INFORMATION 



1. Date of Opening April 3, 1929 

2. Plant: 

Value of Property: 

Real estate including buildings $ 94,851.95 

Personal property 8,504.36 



Total... ....: % 103,356.31 





YEARS ENDED 




June 30, 1931 


June 30, 1932 


3. To tal acreage of property owned 




488 
35 


488 


4. Additional acreage rented 

Total acreage under cultivation during year 


35 


5 . Officers and employees actually in service at end of 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


year. 

Superintendent... 

Secretary . 

Head matron 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


1 




Kitchen matron 




Housemother 

Farm director 




Farmhand 




Supervisory worker (part time) 








Total 


2 


4 


6 


2 


6 


8 







Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



11 



TABLE NO. 2 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



RECEIPTS 

1 . Balance on hand from previous year 

2. Appropriation _- 

3 . Received from institutional receipts 

4. Received from all other sources 

5. Total receipts 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Expenditures for Maintenance: 

6. Salaries and wages 

7. Jrovisions (food) 

8. Fuel, light and water 

9 . All other expenditures for maintenance 

10. Total expenditures for maintenance 

11. Expenditures for permanent improvements including 

additional land and buildings 

12. Expenditures for all other purposes, if any.. 

13. Total expenditures 

14. Amount reverted to General Fund. 

15. Balance on hand at close of year 

16. Total disbursements including balance and 

amount reverted to General Fund 



YEARS ENDED 



June 30, 1931 



$ 6,087.38 
3,718.51 
1,259.18 
5,300.33 



$ 6,080.86 

18,000.00 

211.87 



% 24,292.73 



$ 15,365.40 
5,470.04 



$ 20,835.44 

2,846.47 

610.82 



$ 24.292.73 



June 30, 1932 



S 5,981.87 
1,691.96 
880.00 
4,925.00 



610.82 

20,000.00 

53.16 

150.00 



$ 20,813.98 



$ 13,478.83 
150.00 



$ 13,628.83 

6,574.33 

610.82 



$ 20,813.98 



12 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



TABLE NO. 3 
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 





YEARS 


ENDED 


* 


June 30, 1931 


June 30, 1932 


Number on Books First of Year: 

1. In institution , 


30 


31 


2. In custody outside institution . 










3. Total number first of year (sum of items 1 and 2) 


30 • 
34 


31 


Admissions During Year: 

4. From courts . . 


65 


5 . Transferred from other institutions 




6. Parole violators returned-. 






7. Escapes recaptured 


8 


6 


8. Others 










9. Total admissions <s'im of items 4 to 8 inclusive) 


42 


71 






10. Sum of items 3 and 9 -- 


72 


102 


Discharges During Year: 

11. Paroled 


33 
8 


43 


12. Escaped from institution 


7 






14. Died 




1 


15. Transferred to other institutions . 




3 


16. Other 




3 








17. Total discharges (sum of items 11 to 17 inclusive) 


41 


57 






Number on Books at End of Year: 

18. In institution... . 


31 


42 


19. Outside institution 


4 








20. Total number end of year (sum of items 18 and 19) ... 


31 


46 






21. Sum cf items 17 and 20 should equal item 10 


72 


103 


22. Average daily resident population during year 


31 
60 


43 


23. Normal capacity. 


60 







Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



13 



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Never attended 

school . 

First grade 

Second grade 

Third grade 

Fourth grade. .. 

Fifth grade 

Sixth grade 

Seventh grade.. 
Eighth grade... 

Ninth grade 

Tenth grade 

Eleventh grade. 
Twelfth grade. . 
College 


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14 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



TABLE NO. 5 
ADMISSIONS WITH REFERENCE TO AGE, RACE AND MARITAL STATUS 



AGE 


^ 


TAR ENI 


3ED JUN 


E 30, 1931 


1 


YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1932 


Total 


Single 


Mar- 
ried 


Sepa- 
rated 


Divorced 
or Widow 


Total 


Single 


Mar- 
ried 


Sepa- 
rated 


Divorced 
or Widow 


16 years 


5 
5 
4 
4 
1 
8 
2 
4 
1 


4 
4 
3 
3 
1 
7 




1 
1 

1. 
1 




9 

9 

15 

10 

4 

12 

7 

2 

3 


9 
9 

12 
7 
3 
7 
4 








17 years 








18 years 


1 
1 


3 
3 
1 
5 
2 




19 years 




20 years 




21 to 25 years 

25 to 30 years 




1 

2 
1 


1 
1 


1 


30 to 35 years 

40 to 45 years.. 




2 


1 
2 












Total 


34 


22 


2 


8 


2 


71 


51 


2 


14 


4 







Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



15 



TABLE NO. 6 
GIRLS PAROLED WITH REFERENCE TO LENGTH OF TIME IN INSTITUTION AND PAROLE STATUS 



. 


YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1931 




1 


(TAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1932 




LENGTH OF TIME 


Total 
Pa- 
roled 


Parole Status 




Total 
Pa- 
roled 


Parole Status 






Ex- 
cellent 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 


Un- 
known 


Ex- 
cellent 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 


Un- 

know 




1 




1 








7 
5 
6 
5 
2 
5 
7 


3 
3 
2 


1 
1 
2 
2 


1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 


3 




Seven months 










Eight months... 


















Nine months 


1 
4 
6 
16 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

4 
1 


1 
2 








1 




Ten months 




2 
2 
3 


3 

4 




Eleven months 


1 
1 


2 

1 






Twelve months 


3 


2 




2 


Thirteen months 




Fourteen months 


1 








5 


2 






3 




Fifteen months 


1 












Sixteen months 


1 




















Seventeen months 






















Eighteen months 


1 




1 




















Nineteen months 




















Twenty months.-. 




















































Tw enty-two months 


























Twenty-three months 


























Twenty-four months 


























Twenty-five months 


























Twenty-six months 


























Twenty-seven months 














1 




1 








Twenty-eight months 




















Twenty-nine months 


























Thirty months 


























Thirty-one months 


























Thirty-two months . , 


























Thirty-three months 


























Thirty-four months 




















































Thirty-six months 




















































Total 


33 


7 


9 


3 


7 


7 


43 


12 


10 


12 


7 


2 







16 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



TABLE NO. 7 
DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION BY COUNTIES 



COUNTY 


YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1931 


YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 1932 


Total on 
June 30 


Admission 
During Year 


Exits 
During Year 


Total on 
June 30 


Admission 
During Year 


Exits 
During Year 


Anson 




2 
2 
1 
2 
1 




2 
2 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 
4 
3 


1 


Avery . 






2 


Beaufort 


2 


2 


1 


Buncombe 


3 


Burke. 






1 


Caldwell 






2 
2 


1 


Columbus 










1 


Craven,. _ 


1 
1 
1 




1 
1 






Cumberland 






4 


1 


Catawba 




1 
1 




Davidson . 


1 






1 


Duplin 


1 


1 
1 






Edgecombe 


1 


1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


2 
1 


2 


Forsyth 




1 


Franklin 




1 
1 
3 




1 


Green. 






1 
5 
1 
3 
5 


1 


Guilford _.. 


1 
1 


2 
1 


2 


Halifax. 




Harnett 






3 


Iredell 


1 
1 


2 


1 
1 


1 


3 


Jackson . . 




Johnson 


2 


2 


2 
4 
1 


4 


Lenoir 


2 


2 


1 


Lincoln . 






1 


Macon 


1 
1 




1 
1 






Martin 










Mitchell 






2 
2 
3 




Moore .. 


1 


2 
2 
1 


3 




1 


Nash 


2 

1 


4 


Orange. 






1 


Pasquotank 








Tender. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Person 




Pitt 












Robeson 


1 
1 
2 
1 


2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 


2 
1 
3 


2 


Richmond 


1 


Rutherford 




Sampson 


2 




Swain 






Stanly 












Surry . 


1 








1 


Union 


1 




1 


1 


Vance 


2 
3 
1 

1 


2 
4 

1 
1 




Wake 


2 


1 




1 


Washington 

Wayne. .. . ... ... 

Wilkes 






1 


1 


2 
2 
1 


2 
1 












1 


Yadkin 


1 




1 

















Industrial Farm Colony for Women 17 

TABLE NO. 8 

ADMISSIONS with reference to mental age and offense 



OFFENSE 



Prostitution 

Larceny 

Driving while drunk. 



YFAR ENDED JUNE 30 1932 



Total 



35 
3 
2 



Mental Age 



From 8-2 to 15-9 
15-9, 17-1 and 15-7 
9-5 and 9-1 



Only 40 cases examined. 
65% under 70 I. Q. 
25% between 70 and 90 I. Q. 
10% between 90 and 107 I. Q. 

TABLE NO. 9 

DENTAL REPORT OF WORK DONE AT STATE FARM COLONY 

FOR WOMEN 

June 1, 1931, through June 30, 1932 

Number of visits 36 

Number of patients examined 92 

Number of patients treated 87 

Number showing positive Vincent's Infection 57 

Number of patients showing pyorrhea 22 

Number of teeth extracted (apical infection) 71 

Number of treatments given 375 

Number of partially erupted Third Molars 23 

Number of cavities of decay 464 

Number of teeth extracted because of decay . 2 

Number of patients showing no cavities 9 

Number of patients showing positive Wassermann and positive 

Vincent's . 18 

Average number of patients seen each visit 10% 

There are several significant facts revealed by these figures. 

First — Over 50% showed a Vincent's Infection, either acute or chronic. 
A microscopical examination was made of a smear taken from the mouth 
of every patient. 

Those receiving intra venous injections of Neo Arsphenamin required 
a fewer number of local treatments in the mouth — a quicker recovery. 

Second — Of the seventy-three teeth extracted sixty-nine showed apical 
infection. In many cases there were several of the so-called pus sacs found 
in one mouth. 

Third — There was clinical evidence of twenty-three partially erupted 
third, molars. No doubt an X-ray examination would have shown a still 
larger number of unerupted and impacted teeth. 

Fourth — An average of over five cavities of decay per patient was 
found. In some instances fifteen to eighteen cavities were charted. 

To summarize in a few words it would be hard to find a hundred mouths 
in a more unhygienic, a more horrible condition. 

(Signed) J. Garves Poole, D.D.S. 



INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY FOR WOMEN 

KINSTON, N. C. 






FINANCIAL REPORT 



FOR THE TWO FISCAL YEARS ENDED 
JUNE 30, 1931 AND JUNE 30, 1932 



20 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



EXHIBIT "A" 

Revenues and Expenditures 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1931 and 1932 



REVENUES 

Appropriations: 

Chapter 295, P. L., 1929, balance ___ 

Other Receipts: 

Sale of range 

Total revenues 

EXPENDITURES 

Dormitory "B" (furniture, equipment, etc.) 

Farm buildings.. 

Fees, insurance, bonds, Dormitory "B" and farm buildings 

Telephone line from Kinston to colony 

Door and steps 

Electric washing machine 

Fencing 

Stove 

Outside metal paint 

Total expenditures 

Balance June 30 



Fiscal Year 
1930-1931 



$ 610.82 



Fiscal Year 
1931-1932 



$ 


6,080.86 


$ 


610.82 
150.00 


$ 


6,080.86 


$ 


760.82 


% 


3,029.47 
251,90 
853.67 

1,335.00 




45.00 
39.95 
36.18 
23.25 
5.62 


% 


5,470.04 


$ 


150.00 



610.82 



EXHIBIT "B" 

Revenues and Expenditures 

MAINTENANCE FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1931 and 1932 



Fiscal Year 
1930-1931 



Fiscal Year 
1931-1932 



REVENUES 

Appropriations: 

Chapter 280, P. L., 1929. 

Chapter 429, P. L.. 1931 

Institutional receipts 

i'otal revenues 

EXPENDITURES 

Administration 

Agriculture 

Custodial care 

Operation and maintenance of plant 

Total expenditures 

Balance reverted to General Fund 



S 18,000.00 
211.87 



$ 20,000.00 
53.16 



$ 18,211.87 



$ 20,053.16 



$ 3,490.13 
3,298.02 
6,252.12 
2,325.13 



3,248.94 

7,952.77 
2,277.12 



S 15,365.40 



S 13,478.83 



$ 2,846.47 



6,574.33 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



21 



EXHIBIT "C" 

AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 

For the Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1931 and 1932 





Fiscal Year 
1930-1931 


Fiscal Year 
1931-1932 


Administration 


$ 


112.58 

106.39 

201.68 

75.01 


$ 


75.55 


Agriculture.. 




Custodial care 


184.95 


Operation and maintenance of plant 


52.96 






Totals 


$ 


495.66 


1 


313.46 






Average number of inmates 




31 




43 







EXHIBIT "D" 

STATEMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL RECEIPTS 

Maintenance Fund 

For the Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1931 and 1932 





Fiscal Year 
1930-1931 


Fiscal Year 
1931-1932 


Gasoline refunds 


1 


36.90 
12.77 
69.70 
14.50 
57.40 
20.60 


$ 




Insurance refunds 




Corn, eggs, vegetables 




Chickens.. _ ... 




Hogs . 




Harvey Motor Co., refund 




Miscellaneous ... 


53.16 






Totals 


S 


211.87 


I 


53.16 







22 



Biennial Report for 1930-31-1931-32 



FARM PRODUCTS USED BY THE INSTITUTION 
FOR YEAR 1931-32 



String Beans 91% bu. 

Butter Beans 8 bu. 

Butter Beans (dried) 3 bu. 

Beets 2% bu. 

Carrots 6 pks. 

Corn 119 doz. 

Cucumbers 24 bu. 

Cabbage 882 lbs. 

Huckleberries 175 qts. 

Lettuce 216 hds. 

Okra 6 pks. 

Onions, green 8 doz. 

Onions, dry 32 pks. 

Peas 37 bu. 

Peppers 4% bu. 

Pimentos 5 bu. 

Irish Potatoes 200 bu. 

Hay 



Sweet Potatoes 150 bu. 

Squash 565 lbs. 

Strawberries 950 qts. 

Turnips 27 bu. 

Tomatoes 4 bu. 

Salad Greens 517 lbs. 

Savoy 250 lbs. 

Collards 1,410 lbs. 

Eggs 1,089 doz 

Chickens 588 lbs. 

Turkeys 56 lbs. 

Milk 1,451 gals. 

Butter 247 lbs. 

Pork . 2,265 lbs. 

Radishes 20 pks. 

Watermelons . 1,933 

Corn 75 bbls. 

12 tons 



CANNING REPORT FOR 1930-31 
(About 300 quarts — no record kept) 



Kraut iy 2 bbls. 

Pickles 1 bbl. 

String Beans 232 qts. 



Squash 22 qts. 

Huckleberries 94 qts. 

Pickled Beans 19 qts. 



CANNING REPORT FOR 1931-32 



Huckleberries 8 qts. 

Blackberries 16 qts. 

Peaches 252 qts. 

Peach Butter 18% qts. 

Peach Pickle 40 qts. 

Peach Juice 24 qts. 

Grape Jelly 65 glasses 

Grape Juice 12% gals. 

Pears 66 qts. 

Melon Pickle 50 qts. 

Melon Preserves 14 qts. 

Strawberries 268 qts. 

Green Beans 212 qts. 

Squash . 185 qts. 



Okra 13 qts. 

Limas 13% qts. 

Beets 8 qts. 

Soup Mixture 44 qts. 

Pickled Beans 24 qts. 

Kraut 2 bbls. 

Salt Pickle 1 bbl. 

Ripe Cucumber Pickles 15 gals. 

Beet Pickles 55 qts. 

Relish 30 qts. 

Sliced Cucumber Pickle 5 qts. 

Chow Chow 16 qts. 

Tomato Pickle 10 qts. 

Pimentos 48 qts. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



23 



ESTIMATES OF THE AMOUNTS REQUIRED FOR MAINTENANCE FOR THE BI-ENNIUM 1933-1935 



PURPOSES AND OBJECTS 



1. Administration: 

Attending board meetings. 

Salary superintendent 

Salary secretary 

Office supplies 

Postage 

Telegraph and telephone. . 

Travel expense 

Printing 

Bonding 



Custodial Care: 
Salaries and wages. 



Food and provisions 

Housekeeping supplies. 

Housekeeping equipment 

Clothing 

Medical and surgical 

Salary farm director 

Wages farm hands 

Feed and forage 

Farm supplies.. 

Farm equipment 

Fertilizer 

Inc. to paroles and runaways- 
Operation and Maintenance': 

Fuel 

Supplies and materials 

Motor vehicle upkeep 

Repairs and alterations 

Insurance 

Electric current 

Grounds 

Motor vehicles 



4. Additions and Betterments: 



Daily population average 

Total cases 

Per capita on daily population 
Per capita on cases 



Expenditures 1931-1933 
(for Comparison) 



Actual 
1931-1932 



173.80 

1,785.00 

935.00 

45.78 

70.43 

131.36 

60.00 

37.97 

8.75 



2,020.00 



1,691.96 
370.41 
104.33 
414.85 
755.45 
991.00 
250.87 
402.45 
392.74 
46.66 
378.39 
196.66 



375.81 
1.80 
551.08 
319.26 
524.96 
504.21 



$ 13,478.83 
43 
102 

313.46 
132.14 



Estimated 
1932-1933 



200.00 
1,620.00 

420.00 
50.00 

100.00 

125.00 
50.00 
75.00 
25.00 



I 2,388.00 

1 additional 

matron 

2,000.00 

300.00 

300.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 

900.00 

300.00 

400.00 

600.00 

400.00 

400.00 

250.00 



1,000.00 
150.00 
600.00 

1,764.00 



500.00 
100.00 



$ 2,531.00 



$ 20,000.00 
60 to 70 
150 to 175 



The Organization Re- 
quests for 1933-1935 



Estimated 
1933-1934 



200.00 
2,000.00 

600.00 
50.00 

100.00 

125.00 
75.00 
75.00 
25.00 



2,500.00 



2,000.00 
400.00 
400.00 
600.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
300.00 
600.00 
600.00 
200.00 
400.00 
300.00 



1,000.00 
150.00 
500.00 
900.00 
500.00 
600.00 
100.00 

1,200.00 



$ 5,000.00 



! 24,000.00 
60 to 70 
150 to 175 



Estimated 
1934-1935 



200.00 
2,000.00 

600.00 
50.00 

100.00 

125.00 
75.00 
75. 0D 
25.00 



$ 2,500.00 



2.000.00 
400.00 
400.00 
600.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
300.00 
600.00 
600.00 
200.00 
400.00 
300.00 



1,000.00 
150.00 
500.00 
900.00 
500.00 
600.00 
100.00 



$ 5,000.00 



$ 22,800.00 
60 to 70 
150 to 175 



Date Due 


h - J 


*$M 






























































































































BRODART, INC Cat No. 23 233 Printed in U S A 



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